Farm to Processing

Two primary ways to process coffee are natural, or dry, processing and wet processing. Processing further sorts the cherries then removes four layers -- pulp, mucilage, parchment and silverskin -- leaving the beans.

When the pulp and all or some of the mucilage are removed, beans are laid in elevated drying tables or on patios to dry to ~11% moisture content to prepare for storage and shipping. Parchment and silverskin are milled off just prior to sorting, quality grading and shipping.

Dennis, our host at Planta Procesadora Diria, raked through an end-of-season batch of organic coffee on a drying patio.

Dennis, our host at Planta Procesadora Diria, raked through an end-of-season batch of organic coffee on a drying patio.

The farm worker's 200 pounds of cherries are now down to ~64 pounds of processed beans

The methods and care in processing can affect flavor profiles. The Costa Rican farm, Las Lajas, it's processing plant shown above, markets several variations based on drying method alone.